9 Comments

  1. Stuart Draper
    June 5, 2015 @ 10:01 pm

    Sad day.

    Eye opening article.

    As you did Scott, I served a mission for my church. I know you went to Italy. For me, I was in Argentina for two years. I’ll never forget watching others and how their time as missionaries ended. Some missionaries seemed to work just as hard on the last week of their mission as they did on their first. Others chose to mentally check out and go home months before they actually got on the plane. They were done. They were ready to move on before their time was up.

    I hope I can stay sharp and keep adding the same level of value throughout each stage of my career.

    Reply

    • Scott Cowley
      June 9, 2015 @ 4:52 am

      I know what you’re talking about, Stu. What’s interesting to me though is that sometimes it’s very unpredictable who finishes that way.

      Reply

  2. Matt
    June 8, 2015 @ 10:28 pm

    It was a snapshot of the professors private and working life. Did you need to put this online or could you not find a good reason to respect the professors privacy at retirement. When you leave your job should your co-worker/cleaner write about your medications, your personal tragedies, your triumphs and your difficulties dealing with the years beyond your peak?

    Reply

    • Scott Cowley
      June 9, 2015 @ 4:58 am

      This is not a bitter jab at the deceased or a rival. I have a tremendous amount of respect for this man as well as a lot of sympathy for what he’s been through. But I hear what you’re saying. It was just a very powerful experience that I saw through one angle and wanted to capture my personal takeaways (even if they were based on erroneous premises) in a way that stayed with me.

      Reply

  3. Earl Grey
    June 8, 2015 @ 11:04 pm

    cheer me up why dont you.

    Reply

    • Scott Cowley
      June 9, 2015 @ 4:59 am

      “…and then I found $20 and all was well again.”

      Reply

  4. Alan
    June 8, 2015 @ 11:33 pm

    This is why maintaining good mental hygiene is critical. After your career has peaked, just because you can’t be on top doesn’t mean you can’t be helpful. It might mean your roles shift, but having a sense of purpose is more important than trying to hold on to something temporary.

    Reply

    • Scott Cowley
      June 9, 2015 @ 5:00 am

      Great thoughts. I can’t say for certain how he was approaching life and whether it was deliberate, but I agree that purpose is something that is attainable, regardless of career stage.

      Reply

  5. Frank Gutierrez
    June 9, 2015 @ 7:56 am

    Thank you for the article.

    Reply

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